ALEXANDER KLUGE, A UTOPIA DO CINEMA

Auditório da Casa do Cinema Manoel de Oliveira
18 JUL - 10 NOV 2021

Em colaboração com a Cinemateca Portuguesa – Museu do Cinema

Auditório Casa do Cinema Manoel de Oliveira

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A writer, filmmaker and philosopher, Alexander Kluge (Halberstadt, 1932) has produced a vast filmic oeuvre in the last six decades, a labyrinthine worksite for the intersection of disparate disciplinary fields as well as a kaleidoscopic synthesis of questions and perplexities that permeate the multiple fronts of his political and cultural engagement.

Close to the Frankfurt School and Theodor Adorno’s personal friend, it was through him that he met the filmmaker Fritz Lang and got involved in making cinema. At that time, Kluge was one of the filmmakers who, in 1962, signed the Oberhausen Manifesto, a document that started the New German Cinema. His artistic path, strongly marked by the search and reinvention of other ways of making cinema and television, in contrast to commercial models, brings together a critique of rationalism with an aesthetics of resistance, gravitating around fiction, the social sciences, film theory and history. His films have been awarded at the most important European film festivals, such as Cannes, Venice (where he received the Golden Lion in 1968 and the Career Prize in 1982) or Berlin.

 

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Past

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A writer, filmmaker and philosopher, Alexander Kluge (Halberstadt, 1932) has produced a vast filmic oeuvre in the last six decades, a labyrinthine worksite for the intersection of disparate disciplinary fields as well as a kaleidoscopic synthesis of questions and perplexities that permeate the multiple fronts of his political and cultural engagement.

Close to the Frankfurt School and Theodor Adorno’s personal friend, it was through him that he met the filmmaker Fritz Lang and got involved in making cinema. At that time, Kluge was one of the filmmakers who, in 1962, signed the Oberhausen Manifesto, a document that started the New German Cinema. His artistic path, strongly marked by the search and reinvention of other ways of making cinema and television, in contrast to commercial models, brings together a critique of rationalism with an aesthetics of resistance, gravitating around fiction, the social sciences, film theory and history. His films have been awarded at the most important European film festivals, such as Cannes, Venice (where he received the Golden Lion in 1968 and the Career Prize in 1982) or Berlin.